OpenNMS XSS Flaw Let Attackers Inject JavaScript Payload

A critical vulnerability in OpenNMS, a widely used network monitoring solution, has been identified, allowing attackers to inject malicious JavaScript payloads through a Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) flaw.

This vulnerability, tracked as CVE-2023-0846, has raised significant concerns due to its potential to compromise the security of networks monitored by OpenNMS.

The XSS flaw stems from improper sanitizing of user input within the OpenNMS web application.

Attackers can exploit this vulnerability by sending specially crafted data to the application, which then reflects the malicious script to the user’s browser without adequate validation.

This allows the attacker to execute arbitrary JavaScript code in the context of the victim’s session, potentially leading to session hijacking, data theft, and unauthorized actions on the application.

OpenNMS XSS Flaw

Exploiting this vulnerability is particularly concerning due to its simplicity and the ease with which attackers can leverage it. 

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By manipulating SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) traps, attackers can inject the XSS payload into the OpenNMS admin dashboard. 

The SonarSource report states that this payload is executed when an administrator views the alarm generated by the manipulated SNMP trap, granting the attacker access to the admin’s session and the broader network.

The impact of the XSS vulnerability is dramatically increased when combined with a command injection flaw in OpenNMS.

Attackers can use the XSS vulnerability to gain initial access and then exploit the command injection vulnerability to execute arbitrary code on the OpenNMS server. 

This combination of vulnerabilities allows for a full compromise of the OpenNMS system, enabling attackers to manipulate network monitoring data, disrupt services, or gain unauthorized access to networked devices.

Impact on OpenNMS

The discovery of these vulnerabilities by SonarSource has prompted urgent action from the OpenNMS community.

The vulnerabilities were addressed in OpenNMS version 31.0.4, which includes fixes to prevent XSS attacks and command injection.

However, the presence of these vulnerabilities highlights the critical need for rigorous input validation and sanitization in network monitoring solutions.

Organizations using OpenNMS are strongly advised to update to the latest version to protect their networks from potential exploitation

XSS vulnerability in OpenNMS, especially when combined with a command injection flaw, represents a security risk.

It underscores the importance of continuous security assessment and prompt patching of vulnerabilities in critical infrastructure components like network monitoring systems.

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