Pentagon Looks Into ‘Critical Compromise’ of Air Force and FBI Contacts

The communications systems of 17 Air Force stations were concerned about “critical compromise” after $90,000 in federal radio technology had been stolen by a Tennessee-based engineer.

According to the warrant that Forbes was able to obtain, the breach could potentially have affected FBI communications.

As law enforcement searched the engineer’s house, they discovered that he had “unauthorized administrator access” to radio communications equipment used by the Air Education and Training Command (AETC), which was “affecting 17 DoD installations”.

The Pentagon defines the possible compromise of technology employed by the AETC, one of the nine “major commands,” as “interrelated and complementary” to Air Force headquarters. This occurred only three months after another breach of security at the Pentagon was exposed.

Air Force Engineer’s Home Raided 

During the raid, authorities also found an open computer screen that showed the suspect was using Motorola radio programming software, which included the “entire Arnold Air Force Base (AAFB) communications system.”

The suspect was running a Motorola radio programming software, “which contained the entire Arnold Air Force Base (AAFB) communications system,” according to a Department of Justice search warrant.

Authorities claimed to have discovered evidence the suspect may have had access to communications of the FBI and several Tennessee state agencies.

He was found to have a USB that included “administrative passwords and electronic system keys” for the AETC radio network, according to a paper outlining the forensics on the technologies that were confiscated from his residence.

He was found to have a USB that included “administrative passwords and electronic system keys” for the AETC radio network, according to a paper outlining the forensics on the technologies that were confiscated from his residence.

Additionally taken from the flash drives were “local law enforcement radio programming files,” Another USB device included “Motorola radio programming files,” which, when accessed, displayed a banner informing the user that they were U.S. government property.

When accessed, installation files found during the search displayed a “CONFIDENTIAL RESTRICTED” pop-up.

The warrant states that “witnesses and co-workers” informed investigators that the suspect sold radios and radio equipment, worked irregular hours, was arrogant, frequently lied, engaged in inappropriate workplace behavior and sexual harassment, had money issues, and owned (Arnold Air Force Base land mobile radio) equipment.

According to investigators, a colleague had twice reported him because of “insider threat indicators” and unauthorized possession of Air Force equipment, reads Forbes report.

According to his LinkedIn profile, the 48-year-old engineer at the Arnold air force base has extensive experience in both radio communications and cybersecurity.

He claimed to have conducted multiple tests of the security at Arnold Air Force Base, enhanced radio communication protection on the site, and knew the encryption used for government data.

As of right moment, the police have not charged the suspect with any crimes.

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